Broad Creatives

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Broad Creatives’ communications design blog is meant to inspire and inform. Curated by our dynamic team, we offer creative insight, inspiration, and strategic marketing tactics to power your brand’s identity.

The Broad Blog

Broad Creatives’ Communications Design Blog is meant to inspire and inform. Curated by our dynamic team, we offer creative insight, inspiration, and strategic marketing tactics to power your brand’s identity.

 

Favorite Font Friday - Tommaso

Every Friday we’re sharing some font love. This week I’m sharing a hip display font from Lost Type Co-op, which is every designer’s favorite resource for free typefaces that don’t look like trash: TOMMASO.

Image credit:  losttype.com

Image credit: losttype.com

Described simply by Canadian designer, Eli Horn as “an opulent display typeface,” Tommaso is a sans-serif display font with blackletter influences. I’ve perused past Tommaso on Lost Type’s website for years, but I first began to appreciate it while designing invitations for my best friend’s Palm Springs wedding in 2016. He and his husband wanted something classic but hip, elegant but masculine, bold but understated. A pinch of Midcentury, a dash of old Hollywood. With its beautifully angled line-width variation and condensed characters, Tommaso was perfect for the contemporary, Modernist vibe we wanted to convey.

Image credit:  FiveThousandFingers.com

Display fonts are not for the fainthearted, nor the inexperienced. I’ll admit to relishing in the early system fonts – including some infamous atrocities ­– that first arrived on the scene when Apple brought desktop publishing to our middle school computer lab. By college, I learned to reign it in and frankly spent the first decade or so of my design career sticking with the classics, or at least the non-confrontational. I gravitated towards neutral sans serifs and relied on color, image, and other design elements to lend voice to my work. It took a long time to feel comfortable experimenting with more decorative typefaces and develop the confidence to know when and how to use them. With very distinct stylization, they can easily feel too affected and lend an amateurish look to any logo, headline, or layout. Display fonts bring the drama, but need balance, white space, and pause to take center stage.

Download Tommaso for the price of your choosing here.

Image credit:  FiveThousandFingers.com
Image credit:  FiveThousandFingers.com
Image credit:  Sagmeister & Walsh

Image credit: Sagmeister & Walsh

Image credit:  Sirene Chocolate

Image credit: Sirene Chocolate

Image credit:  Johan Signér

Image credit: Johan Signér